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  • 19 May 2020
    Axonics® ARTISAN Results Published Demonstrating Continued Therapy Response and Patient Satisfaction at 1-year

    Axonics Modulation Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ: AXNX), a medical technology company focused on the development and commercialization of novel implantable Sacral Neuromodulation (“SNM”) devices for the treatment of urinary and bowel dysfunction, today announced the publication of the 1-year results from its ARTISAN-SNM study in the peer-reviewed journal Neurourology & Urodynamics (“NAU”) https://doi.org/10.1002/nau.24376. Axonics also plans to launch a multi-center registry study in the United States to collect additional real-world clinical evidence on the performance, safety and patient experience with the Axonics r-SNM® System across all approved indications to advance physician knowledge and patient access to rechargeable sacral neuromodulation therapy. 

    “People with urgency incontinence are undertreated and struggle to find long-term relief. The persistent robust response and satisfaction with the Axonics r-SNM System demonstrates that there is a promising new option for people that have been suffering with this condition,” said Karen Noblett, M.D., a board-certified urogynecologist and chief medical officer of Axonics. “Neurourology & Urodynamics is the official journal of both the Society for Urodynamics, Female Pelvic Medicine, and Urogenital Reconstruction (SUFU) and the International Continence Society (ICS), so it has wide distribution among our target clinician audience. We look forward to sharing the 2-year ARTISAN results when available in the fall to add to our growing body of clinical data.”

    The publication in NAU confirms the quality and relevance of the ARTISAN study outcomes. Using a conservative "as treated" analysis method, the 1-year results found that 89% of all implanted patients with the Axonics r-SNM System had successful therapy outcomes, and 93% of treated patients were satisfied with their r-SNM therapy. Currently, 2-year follow-up visits in the ARTISAN study are ongoing.